Start Zajednicar online dating

Zajednicar online dating

The territory of the famous Republic of Dubrovnik (Ragusa), though somehow disconnected from the main part of Croatia, was able to keep balance with great forces, which always had respect for its economic well being and culture, and it remained free due to its numerous diplomatic and economic relations.

Dubrovnik was especially flourishing from the 15th to the 18th century, and was the chief rival to Venice.

In the 16th century Dubrovnik had a fleet of 200 larger ships, which grew to 300 in the 18th century.

The beauty of remains of numerous Croatian stone monuments with interlace ornaments found in Dubrovnik and its environs is truly amazing. Very old and valuable is the Dubrovnik Missal from 12th century, now kept in the Bodleian Library in Oxford. The Missal, written for the Dubrovnik Cathedral , is full of old Gregorian chants, containing more than 200 monodic meodies. Miho Demovi proved that the Missal was written for the Dubrovnik Cathedral, [Demovic, Rasprave i prilozi, p 171-183].

Written in Latin, in Beneventan script, it contains prayers and some chants unique in Europe. For a long time it was believed to have been written in North Italy, until E. It is interesting that as many as 430 monodic melodies are preserved in the Dubrovnik region from that time: 220 are kept in Dubrovnik missals, out of 720 known monodic melodies preserved in the whole of Croatia.

Note that Shakespeare was three years old when Drzic died.

Drzic's plays were translated into Chinese, Czech, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Finish, French, Italian, Japanese, German, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Slovakian, Swahili, Swedish, Ukrainean, and some other languages.

Around 1780 the ships from Dubrovnik were sailed to New York, Baltimore etc. On the island of Sicily, Italy, there is a town called Ragusa.

The English word ARGOSY (= Ragusin ship; Ragusa = Dubrovnik) soon after the first Dubrovnik ships arrived in England in 1510, became synonymous with a large, rich cargo ship (Karaka of Dubrovnik). This town known from ancient times, was rebuilt by Dalmatian settlers in the VIIth century, who gave it the name of their native place (information from "Art and History of Sicily", Casa Editriche Bonechi, Firenze, Italy, p. An Italian naval historian Bartolomeo Crescentio, author of "La Nautica Mediterranea", 1602, Rome, states that the Ragusans were the best builders of galleons in the Mediterranean and that the Argosy was a galleon of Ragusa.

The Ragusan name can be found in numerous places of the New World. In other words, the Grad (the City) is at least thousand years older than it was believed until recently, see [Nicetic].

This is confirmed by excavations carried out in 1980s and 1990s.

It is strange that "The World Book Dictionary", an important American dictionary of the English language, claims for "argosy" to be an "Italian (! ) which traded extensively with England in the 1500's". The Dubrovnik galleon Argosy is mentioned in two Shakespeare's plays: "Merchant of Venice" and "Taming the Shrew". Blasius, Armenian martyr from 3/4 centuries), patron of the City.